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Avoiding Critical Issue Overload

by Stan B. Walters, CSP
“The Lie Guy®”

You finally have your subject in the interview room. You’ve built a substantial case against your subject and you’re sure there’s no way he or she can deny the overwhelming information you compiled against them. When the time is right you “unload” on the subject. You give them “both barrels” and then you stand back waiting for your subject to crumble under the sheer wait of the proof of your case. After a short pause your subject simply tells you you’re wrong and says “No.” So what happened? You had a great interrogation dialogue all set up. Simple. It was a case of “critical issue overload.” You pushed too much information on your subject all at once and forced your subject to reject the entire argument of proof thereby disabling your interview.

First, your subject was heavily under stress to begin with. Now you have forced your subject into making a single critical decision with what appears to them to be of totally overwhelming proportions. To him or her it is the most expedient way to escape from the pressure that the reality they’ve just been forced to confront.

Second, you set yourself up to have your interview argument to be shut down with a single simple answer – No. Your subject saw that you gave them a simple “out” and they took it leaving your argument hanging and unresolved.

Avoid “critical issue overload” techniques in the interview room. Spread out your case information by addressing smaller more manageable arguments. This keeps your subject from feeling mentally and emotionally overwhelmed with the reality of the facts they may be facing. String out your case arguments addressing only one issue at a time. Now your subject is forced to deal with each issue one at a time creating a training effect. Even though they have just dealt with one issue, there’s the next coming right behind the first. You are also more likely to get a toehold on your subject’s resistance by getting acceptance on a few issues. Once you win one or two points, it much easier to argue subsequent proof and avoid one mass rejection of your entire case.

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